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    Dahlias

    Short White Dahlia With Bud 20.5"
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    Small White Dahlia Spray 22"
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    Small White Dahlia Spray 22" 5 reviews $15.99
    Small Cerise Pink Dahlia Spray 22"
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    Red and Apricot Dahlia with Bud 20.5"
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    White and Pink Dahlia With Bud 20.5"
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    Small White and Pink Dahlia Spray 22"
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    Large Orange and Yellow Dahlia with Bud 41"
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    Pale Yellow Dahlia 20"
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    Pale Yellow Dahlia 20" 3 reviews $11.99
    Apricot and Peach Dahlia 32"
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    Pink Nymphs Dahlia 19.5"
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    Pink Blush Dahlia 22.5"
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    Golden Yellow Dahlia 33"
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    Burgundy Red Dahlia 33"
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    Burgundy Red Dahlia 33" 1 review $19.99
    Large Mauve Dahlia with Bud 41"
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    Light Green Dahlia 20"
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    Light Green Dahlia 20" 8 reviews $11.99
    Large Golden Yellow Dahlia with Bud 41"
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    Golden Yellow Dahlia with Bud 33"
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    Grand Yellow Dahlia 47"
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    Pink Pompom Dahlia 19.5"
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    Minimum 2

    About Dahlias

    The Grand Duchess of the flowers was named after Dhal, pupil of the great 18th century Swedish botanist Linnaeus.

    This flower is native to Mexico, was a symbol of war to the Aztecs, and introduced to France by accident.  It all started when some stolen cochineal beetles were being smuggled into France (to produce red dye) alongside some gathered tubers that were its intended food source. However, instead of agave tubers, the smugglers gathered dahlia tubers - which the beatles didn’t eat, died, and only dahlia the tubers remained, which instead found their way to Empress Josephine, who discovered what they grew into.  Word has it that these tubers were so highly prized and valuable they were worth more than diamonds!

    In the language of flowers, it means – ‘forever yours’ & my gratitude exceeds your care. 

    The Victorians associated them with instability, perhaps due to their inability to last through an English winter.

    These flowers come in many colours, shapes and sizes,  from ball & pompom so named after the bobble on a French sailor hat, to cactus water lily, mignon, dinner plate and anemone.